Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/68316
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Hierarchical fruit selection by Neotropical leaf-nosed bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae)
Author: Andrade, TY
Thies, W
Rogeri, PK
Kalko, EKV
Mello, MAR
Abstract: It is crucial to understand how Neotropical leaf-nosed bats select fruits, because their choices strongly affect the seed dispersal process, especially of pioneer plants. We tested the hypothesis of hierarchical fruit selection by phyllostomid bats at the levels of the bat genus and species by combining a literature database with field experiments. Considering our database for the whole Neotropics, Artibeus bats focus on Ficus (Moraceae) and Cecropia (Cecropiaceae), Carollia bats on Piper (Piperaceae), and Sturnira bats on Solanum (Solanaceae). Results from a field experiment in Brazil corroborated those preferences, because bats of those 3 genera selected 1st the fruits of their preferred plant genera, even when secondary fruits were offered in higher abundance. In another field experiment in Panama, we observed that 2 sympatric Carollia species, although focusing on the same plant genus, prefer different Piper species. Literature records for the whole range of the 2 Carollia species show that they have strongly nested diets. Our findings corroborate the hypothesis that frugivorous phyllostomids do not forage opportunistically, and, moreover, segregate their diets hierarchically at the genus and species levels.
Subject: diet
foraging
frugivory
mutualism
nestedness
optimal foraging
plant-animal interactions
seed dispersal
Country: EUA
Editor: Alliance Communications Group Division Allen Press
Citation: Journal Of Mammalogy. Alliance Communications Group Division Allen Press, v. 94, n. 5, n. 1094, n. 1101, 2013.
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1644/12-MAMM-A-244.1
Date Issue: 2013
Appears in Collections:Unicamp - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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