Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://repositorio.unicamp.br/jspui/handle/REPOSIP/2023
Type: Artigo de periódico
Title: Identification of intracellular peptides in rat adipose tissue: Insights into insulin resistance
Author: Berti, Denise A.
Russo, Lilian C.
Castro, Leandro M.
Cruz, Lilian
Gozzo, Fabio C.
Heimann, Joel C.
Lima, Fabio B.
Oliveira, Ariclecio C.
Andreotti, Sandra
Prada, Patricia O.
Heimann, Andrea S.
Ferro, Emer S.
Abstract: Intracellular peptides generated by the proteasome and oligopeptidases have been suggested to function in signal transduction and to improve insulin resistance in mice fed a high-caloric diet. The aim of this study was to identify specific intracellular peptides in the adipose tissue of Wistar rats that could be associated with the physiological and therapeutic control of glucose uptake. Using semiquantitative mass spectrometry and LC/MS/MS analyses, we identified ten peptides in the epididymal adipose tissue of the Wistar rats; three of these peptides were present at increased levels in rats that were fed a high-caloric Western diet (WD) compared with rats fed a control diet (CD). The results of affinity chromatography suggested that in the cytoplasm of epididymal adipose tissue from either WD or CD rats, distinctive proteins bind to these peptides. However, despite the observed increase in the WD animals, the evaluated peptides increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with palmitate. Thus, intracellular peptides from the adipose tissue of Wistar rats can bind to specific proteins and facilitate insulin-induced glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.
Subject: Adipose tissue
Biomedicine
Insulin resistance
Obesity
Peptide-protein interaction
Editor: Wiley-Blackwell
Citation: Proteomics. Wiley-Blackwell, v.12, n.17, p.2668-2681, 2012
Rights: fechado
Identifier DOI: 10.1002/pmic.201200051
Date Issue: 2012
Appears in Collections:IQ - Artigos e Outros Documentos

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